Posted on Friday 4 April.

Font Men

Hoefler & Frere-Jones was one of the most successful, respected, and influential type design studios around. This short film, which was produced by AIGA to celebrate H+FJ’s AIGA Medal, gives us a peek behind the curtain at the work and process of Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones, and comes right as the duo is going through a nasty and public break-up.

Bad Hair Day

This print by artist Lim Heng Swee (aka ILoveDoodle) just makes me smile.

(via Designers Go To Heaven)

Edouard Martinet

French artist Edouard Martinet creates amazing sculptures using a variety of discarded scrap parts from things like old bicycles, cars, and mopeds, as well as kitchen pans, typewriter keys, and other found objects.

See more at MyModernMet, This Is Colossal, and Martinet’s site.

Posted on Friday 8 July with 1 note.

Jean Jullien

I’m really digging the work of French artist Jean Jullien. See more at his site.

(via The Fox is Black)

Luba Lukova

These are just a few posters from Luba Lukova’s “Social Justice” series from 2008. Lukova’s work is beautiful in its strength and starkness, and her posters capture their themes so cleverly. You can see more of her work, including the other posters in the series, at her site.

Posted on Thursday 30 June with 3 notes.

Brian Biggs

Illustrator Brian Biggs creates fun illustrations. With his quirky characters, vibrant colors and textures, and crazy detail, his work is just really fun to look at. Brian’s subject matter many times revolves around cars, airplanes, or robots, and the worlds he creates bustle with life. But even his single character illustrations contain rich textures, inventive uses of color, and cool line work, and make me want to look at them for hours. Go see more images on his site.

(All images via his site)

Posted on Wednesday 29 June with 1 note.

Julius Shulman

I recently saw a documentary chronicling the life and work of Julius Shulman (1910-2009) called “Visual Acoustics: The Modernism of Julius Shulman.” Shulman was a photographer who specialized in images of architecture. Above is perhaps his most recognized photograph, “Case Study House #22, Los Angeles, 1960; Pierre Koenig, Architect,” which also serves as the cover for the documentary. Shulman had an incredible eye for shooting modern architecture, capturing the structures in a way that didn’t just record what they looked like, but rather highlighted their uniqueness and beauty. 

(photo via Getty.edu)


Above: Convair Astronautics, San Diego, CA, 1958; Pereira & Luckman, Architects

(photo via Getty.edu)

 

Above: Shulman at work

(photo via takesunset.com)

Posted on Monday 27 June with 1 note.

Craig Frazier

I really love Craig Frazier’s graphic, colorful, surreal, and cleverly designed illustrations. You can see more of his work at his newly relaunched website here.

Posted on Wednesday 22 June with 1 note.
I grew up reading Archie comics digests, where they reprinted a lot of the older Archie strips from the 50s and 60s. My favorite Archie artists were Dan Decarlo, Harry Lucey, and Bob Montana (even if at the time I didn’t know their names).
Bob Montana (1920-1975) was co-creator of Archie and the gang, and if you compare his early Archie work from the 40s to his later work from the 60s and 70s, you can get a good sense for the evolution of the characters.
Montana’s linework seems so effortless, and his inking incredibly fluid. His characters always seemed vibrant and energetic, and actually looked like the teenagers they were supposed to be and not twenty-something adults.
Check out more Bob Montana originals at the Three Men in a Tub blog.

I grew up reading Archie comics digests, where they reprinted a lot of the older Archie strips from the 50s and 60s. My favorite Archie artists were Dan Decarlo, Harry Lucey, and Bob Montana (even if at the time I didn’t know their names).

Bob Montana (1920-1975) was co-creator of Archie and the gang, and if you compare his early Archie work from the 40s to his later work from the 60s and 70s, you can get a good sense for the evolution of the characters.

Montana’s linework seems so effortless, and his inking incredibly fluid. His characters always seemed vibrant and energetic, and actually looked like the teenagers they were supposed to be and not twenty-something adults.

Check out more Bob Montana originals at the Three Men in a Tub blog.

Kirby Ferguson’s “Everything is a Remix” series is fascinating to watch! Click the video above to watch Part 3, or visit his website to catch Parts 1 and 2.

(via Everything is a Remix)